BUSINESS & PRODUCTIVITY

Whether it’s best practices for billing, how to get more organized, increased productivity–check out some of our picks.

As the hipster classic Craft, Inc. did for crafters, this book will teach all types of creatives illustrators, photographers, graphic designers, animators, and more how to build a successful business doing what they love. Freelancing pros Meg Mateo Ilasco and Joy Deangdeelert Cho explain everything from creating a standout portfolio to navigating the legal issues of starting a business. Accessible, spunky, and packed with practical advice, Creative, Inc. is an essential for anyone ready to strike out on their own.

In The Business of Editing, Richard H. Adin, An American Editor, discusses the roles, tools, processes, profits, career, and future of freelance editing–460 pages of solid thinking and useful advice for anyone who makes a living working with words. “This collection of essays is a must-read for any editorial freelancers who own their own business. Covering both theory and practice, Adin’s no-nonsense approach to the business of editing will appeal to new starters and seasoned pros alike.

Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing & Ethical Guidelines, 14th Edition is an indispensable resource for people who create graphic art and those who buy it. As the graphic art marketplace continues to evolve to meet the needs of both digital and print media and as clients struggle with shrinking budgets in the current economy, the need for up-to-date information on business, ethical, and legal issues is greater than ever. Find it all here in the 14th Edition.

Do you ever look at the clock and wonder where the day went? You spent all this time at work and didn’t come close to getting everything done. Tomorrow try something new. Use the Pomodoro Technique to work in focused sprints throughout the day. In Pomodoro Technique Illustrated, Staffan N teberg shows you how to organize your work to accomplish more in less time. There’s no need for expensive software or fancy planners. You can get started with nothing more than a piece of paper, a pencil, and a kitchen timer.